Friday, January 11, 2008

The Reproaches

(Thanks to Josh for the text) .

The congregational response is silence,
because we have no answer.





- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
V.
O my people, what have I done to you?
How have I hurt you? Answer me.

R.
. . .
V.
O my people, what have I done to you?
How have I hurt you? Answer me.

R.
. . .

V.
I led you out of Egypt,
From slavery I set you free.
I brought you into a land of promise:
You have prepared a cross for me.

I led you as a shepherd,
I brought you dryshod through the sea;
I fed you manna in the desert
You have prepared a cross for me.

I fought for you in battles,
I won you strength and victory;
Gave you a royal crown and sceptre:
You have prepared a cross for me.

I planted you, my vineyard,
And cared for you most tenderly;
Looked for abundant fruit and found none:
Only the cross you made for me.

Then listen to my pleading
And do not turn away from me.
You are my people: will you reject me?
For you I suffer bitterly.
R.
. . .


- - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -

4 comments:

Screeching in the Angelic Choir said...

This is one of my favourite liturgical pieces along with the Exsultet of the Great Vigil of Easter. Oh, how I wish it was included in the Book of Common Prayer. I'd push for it to be included in the Book of Occasional Services at least!

Oh, I just posted up my "A Litany of the Saints" on my blog as I promised to you the other night. Come and check it out! You know I always value your opinion.

-Josh

David Walker said...

Eric,
A very moving post. Wonderful icon & picture at the end.

Josh,
I suspect the reason it was not included (even in BOC) is from a (perhaps misguided) fear that the text might be seen as offensive to the Jews. The Church is trying to be sensitive to that out of sense of guilt for the influence Christian liturgy may have had on anti-semitism. I'm not advocating this way of looking at it, but that's the reality these days. I always had the choir sing the Victoria setting. One of the things I miss in retirement (and indeed during the years I was a hospital chaplain) is planning and facilitating beautiful liturgies. But all of life is liturgy in a sense.

Davis said...

The Reproaches are gorgeous examples of liturgical poetry at its best.

I'd suggest the response of silence is right, though I might include tears.

Episcopollyanna said...

This is really beautiful. I've read it several times now and have been meaning to comment.

Also wanted to let you know that Madpriest listed you as a blog to visit - you should check it out if you haven't already. :)